Rarangi Kupu/ Glossary

Rarangi Kupu/ Glossary

Important and Maori key terminology

Tikanga – A correct way of procedure, method, custom, protocol

Mana – Ones power, prestige, authority, respect, influence, status

Kaupapa – Topic, agenda, policy, subject

Korero – story, narrative, conversation

Powhiri – welcome ritual/ceremony

Whenua – Land

Mihimihi – greetings, tribute.

Poroporoaraki – Farewell

Atua – ancestor, god, deity

Tangata – Peoples, persons.

Tapu – sacred, restricted, prohibited

Hapu – kinship group, sub- tribe

Taonga – Treasure, property, prized possessions

Whakapapa – genealogy, lineage, descent

Iwi – tribe, nationality, nation

Matauranga – Knowledge, understanding, wisdom

Moana – Ocean

Awa – River

Maunga – Mountai

Te Tiriti o Waitangi – Treaty of Waitangi

Tiro Rangatiratanga – self determination,autonomy, sovereignty

 

 

237.131 – Wk 4 Blog task

237.131 – Wk 4 Blog task

Whanaungatanga

Meaning – relationship, kinship, sense of familiar connection through shared experiences. Not just limited to blood family as others with close bond are also included.

This term is one of the main elements that make up the values of Tikanga. Whanau (Family/Kin). The idea of Whanaungatanga is of relationships and supporting one another. It can be applied to art and design  The relationship between the art/design, the audience or viewers and the artist themselves if they so wish to be included. The term recognises and emphasises the importance of embracing and supporting each other from near and afar and how fragile relationships are, therefore require nurturing.

“Whaungatanga embraces the whakapapa and focuses upon relationships” (Mead. Chapter 2)

Intellectual Property and Copyright Laws

There are many faults in way in which intellectual property and copyright laws exist to address the misuse of Taonga works  but the main issue is the difference in Western and Maori ideals of protection. Taonga are two things – a body of work in which it embodies a pre-existing set of values, insights and knowledge (matauranga maori) and it is the creative efforts of the real individual person/s.  Since the IP laws were founded upon western ideals and understandings , the laws refer to how the creator has exclusive rights of the physical work by “excluding others from using it” (33.) However  this actually contrasts highly against the Maori ideals of Kaitiakanga which  ” obligations in respect of taonga works and the underlying matauranga”(33) meaning that it’s not just the physical misuse of the work that must be protected but also the information it presents.

Internationally, how Taonga works are to be used are not efficiently protected or regulated as stated by the International IP laws due to the limitations of the laws – “It establishes the minimum standards of protection in several areas including copy rights, trademarks, geographical indications, industrial designs, patens and plant variety rights that all members of the World Trade Organisation must comply with ” (1.1.15)

Furthermore, (Taonga Works and Intellectual property) state that IP rules are not 100% guaranteed in protecting works of misuse . “However, IP rules are never absolute. A balance is constantly being struck by the interests of the creator or inventor in receiving a fair award for their creative efforts and the interests of the wider community in access to and the use of the knowledge” (33)

While Maori have brought up the issue of how the IP laws are not fully equipped to protect the works and kaitiaki relationships of Taonga, the Crown has argued back putting any more regulations in place would “stifle innovation and deprive others of access to knowledge and underpin or inspire the creation of new works” (34). Therefore these IP laws and copyright laws are not completely successful in protecting the Taonga works of Maori.

 

 

 

Works Cited

Mead, Hirini Moko. “Chapter 2: Nga Putake o te Tikanga – Underlying Principles and Values”. Tikanga Maori: Living By Maori Values. Aotearoa: Huia Publishers, 2003. 25-34. Print.

Taonga Works and Intellectual Property (2011) in Ko Aotearoa Tenei – A Report into Claims Concerning New Zealand Law and Policy Affecting Maori Culture and Identity.

Assessment 1 -237.131 Wk 3 blog task

Assessment 1 -237.131 Wk 3 blog task

 

 

 

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Aotea Utanganui Museum of South Taranaki. Photo Richard Wotton.

 

Made during the period of Te Tipunga the growth (1200 TO 1500CE), the haumi (Cover) was created to deflect oncoming waves from the canoe prow. The haumi was discovered in a swamp site near Patea in 1975 and

One aspect of the haumi that directly relates to the period it was from and the context is the interesting carvings that decorate the tool/art. It shows that creators were transitioning between the Eastern Polynesian style of carving into the late Maori carving style. By hand chiseling into the timber, the haumi close up shows small pecks that add up to a design. It shows the crucial in-between stage before Maori completely changed into their own traditional and original style.There are traces of the geometric and ancestral designs of the East Polynesian style mixed with evidence of the distinctive Maori forms.

Works Cited

Harris, Atholl Anderson, Judith Binney and Aroha. “Chapter Three: Pieces of the Past.” Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History. New Zealand: Bridget Williams, 2012. 70-101. Print.

Assessment 1 -237.131 Wk 2 blog task

Assessment 1 -237.131 Wk 2 blog task

 

Chosen artwork – Hei Tiki

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Hei Tiki, which translates to Hei – Neck pendant and Tiki -Human, are important examples of art that has been passed down the Maori Culture. They symbolized the significance of lineage and were highly prized possessions worn by both men and women. Also known to be given to pregnant women as a source of protection. These carvings were generally made out of various stones, bone or wood and were known to be worn on formal occasions.

Later evolved over time into more of an original Maori classic design which differentiated from the early 17th century Polynesian designs with more symmetrical forms.

Atoll Anderson states that “A number of contemporary Maori artists explore the meaning and significance of Hei Tiki.” which shows the just how important this design is to the Maori history and culture as it is still being analysed and explored.

Works cited

Harris, Atholl Anderson, Judith Binney and Aroha. “Ancient Origins.” Tangata Whenua: An Illustrated History. New Zealand: Bridget Williams, 2012. 16-41. Print.

Wk 11 -Assessment 3 workbook process

Wk 11 -Assessment 3 workbook process

Creative work development

Researching colour theory, I am going to create a work that is symbolic not only in the images but the colours.

For the happy child side, I am going to use colours that evoke this emotion such as red, yellow, orange and the background will be a clean white. The bright, warm colours are often used to show and encourage feelings of happiness, optimism, vitality and energy. Yellow especially represents laughing, happiness, sunshine and cheerfulness.

For the sad child side, I am using colours of blue, green and grey to emphasise the sad and empty emotions. The blue can mean sad, depressed, empty and hopeless.

 

Chosen Creative Work Concept

For my final creative work, I want to explore on how I can make an effective statement with a medium that will effectively capture the audiences attention and give an emotional response. I find the emotive statements and art works do best.

 

Development creative work concept

I have cut out silhouettes of two young girls – one happy and carefree girl and a sad girl in a crouching, defensive position. Then I inserted three cuts, and separated the silhouette bodies and then traced them onto coloured card. Then I proceeded to make the cuts. I then cut up a 1/3rd block of black card and stuck it onto a full A4 sized white card. The colours of the background represent the future for each of the girls – large white background is a hopeful and pleasant future while the small, black background represents her shorter lifespan, black future filled with dark.

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I am still working on what iconographical images I could use to enhance my work.

Terms

Agency – a business or organization providing a particular service on behalf of another business, person, or group.

social responsibility – an ethical framework which suggest that an individual or company has a responsibility to action change to benefit the society at a large scale.

” Social responsibility is a duty every individual has to perform so as to maintain a balance between the economy and the ecosystems” – Wikipedia definition.

transformative practices – practices that enable change.

Works cited

“Basic Color Theory.” Basic Color Theory. N.p., n.d. Web

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “Afterword: Visual Activism”. How to See the World. London: Pelican, 2015. 287-298. Print.

Gorney, Cynthia. “Too Young to Wed.” National Geographic 2011: n. pag. Print.

Bicker, Jack. “Too Young to Wed – the Secret Life of Child Brides.” Fairplanet.org. N.p., 8 June 2013. Web.

“About Child Marriages.” Girls Not Brides.org. N.p., n.d. Web.

Documenting Child Marriage for Over a Decade-and Still Going.” PROOF. N.p., 2015. Web.

India – Child Marriage Around The World. Girls Not Brides.” Girls Not Brides. N.p., n.d. Web.

Pande, Manisha. “A Young Trio Uses 39,000 White Bindis as a Powerful Idiom against Child Marriage | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis.” Dna. N.p., 2014. Web

Olson. Carol.”The Pixel Project’s “16 For 16″ Campaign.” The Pixel Projects 16 For 16 Campaign. N.p., n.d. Web.

Lemmon, Gayle Tzemach. The Daily Beast. Newsweek/Daily Beast, n.d. Web

“Nadia, 16, Whose Husband Cruelly Cut off Her Both Ears, Nose and Shaved Her Head.” IRIN. N.p., n.d. Web

“Child Bride in Yemen Dies of Internal Bleeding on Wedding Night: Activist.” Reuters. Thomson Reuters, 2013. Web.

“11-year-old Bride Sets Herself on Fire to Avoid Marriage – Articles – Easy Weddings.” Articles. N.p., 2014. Web.

Wk 13 – Final blog post

Wk 13 – Final blog post

 

In Mirzoeff’s chapter 7 of “How to see the world”, we are shown that art and activism goes hand in hand to create some of the most powerful and moving messages to society and the world. From this chapter I chose the topic of illegal child marriages.

 

Throughout my research I found that in countries such as India, Afghanistan,  Bangladesh, India, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Morocco, Pakistan,Niger, Chad, Mali, Guinea, South Sudan, Burkina Faso, Malawi, Mozambique, – with the 8 having the highest percentages of child marriage according to Unicef. Girls and women are considered a lower value and are traded  as they are considered a form of currency – they are not individuals but essentially ‘money’. Furthermore factors that fuel child marriages include, poverty, gender inequality, cultures and traditions, insecurity and lack of education.

These child marriages are not only awful to the girls and women but have severe impacts on the societies that allow them.Stopping child marriages would allow for a lot more development in critical areas and it would be very beneficial to all.There are so many  social, cultural and economical impacts of resolving this issue that some people may not be aware of.

Social – The gender inequality would dramatically reduce and women would not be undervalued and traded as currency but respected as men are. Therefore equality across genders would be balanced and socially able and capable society would form.

Cultural – The cultures and traditions that have long existed are outdated however it will be affected in a positive way if this was to stop as women would not have to suffer and would build a much more positive gender friendly culture and society.

Economic – Women and young girls would have a chance to get an education, qualifications and work, therefore contributing to the local and national economy as more workers are available.

 

As a 21st century citizen of the global world, I have noticed ethics and empathy has become increasingly more visualised and people have become more vocal about their opinions. As Mirzoeff stated in chapter 7, the Michael Brown case sparked a national outcry and protests and visual activism exploded around the country. Like the mentioned case, the citizens of the 21st century show they do care and that they can instigate change. Much like this case, child marriages need to protested and voiced out so as a world society, we can bring about change.
My own creative project reflects Mirzoeff’s ideas of ‘visual thinking’ and ‘visual activism’. My ‘Artivisism’ ( artist and activist) came up with a poster that while simple in design, was effective in communicating a message. I didn’t want any overly complicated components to overpower my main message of comparing the two girls of how they were going to spend the rest of their childhood – one lives a normal life that a child should and enjoys her childhood. The other is a victim of child marriage and does not even have a childhood. I wanted to highlight and capture the difference between these two children and show hope swell as hopelessness.

This piece is to highlight the difference between “normal” children and young girls who face child marriage and their futures that lie ahead of them. One has a bright and clear future, while the other has a bleak ending. (Representative of the young child brides that often attempt to end their lives)

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White Bindi Project

The activist I have also taken some inspiration from is Prakhar Jain who started the White Bindi project – a group whose aim and focus is to raise funds and spread awareness of the illegal child marriages occurring across the globe. This campaign of his with his fellow colleagues took photos of real life child brides and visually spreads awareness of this ongoing issue.

As global citizens of the world, we should all be thinking about this great injustice against women and children as it emphasis how some countries and cultures still place a lower value on the female gender. It is relevant to everyone as it reflect that while our world society has evolved far from the olden days of massive gender inequality, it still goes on despite the era of the 21st century. We must protest this through our collective voices and as Unicef says ” together we can end child marriage”.

“If we can end child marriage, we can change the lives of girls everywhere and help them to enjoy their childhoods; enrol them in school; protect them from complicated pregnancies and births. We can keep girls safe. And as we do all of this, we help break the cycle of intergenerational poverty… We must galvanise political commitment and dedicate resources for girls to realise their rights and fulfil their potential. Together we can end child marriage”.  – executive directors of UNICEF, UNFPA and UN Women (International Day of the Girl 2012)

 

Works cited/ references

Mirzoeff, Nicholas. “Afterword: Visual Activism”. How to See the World. London: Pelican, 2015. 287-298. Print.

Gorney, Cynthia. “Too Young to Wed.” National Geographic 2011: n. pag. Print.

http://www.worldvision.org/news-stories-videos/ten-worst-places-child-marriage

Bicker, Jack. “Too Young to Wed – the Secret Life of Child Brides.” Fairplanet.org. N.p., 8 June 2013. Web.

“About Child Marriages.” Girls Not Brides.org. N.p., n.d. Web.

Documenting Child Marriage for Over a Decade-and Still Going.” PROOF. N.p., 2015. Web.

India – Child Marriage Around The World. Girls Not Brides.” Girls Not Brides. N.p., n.d. Web.

Pande, Manisha. “A Young Trio Uses 39,000 White Bindis as a Powerful Idiom against Child Marriage | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis.” Dna. N.p., 2014. Web

Olson. Carol.”The Pixel Project’s “16 For 16″ Campaign.” The Pixel Projects 16 For 16 Campaign. N.p., n.d. Web.

Lemmon, Gayle Tzemach. The Daily Beast. Newsweek/Daily Beast, n.d. Web

“Child Bride in Yemen Dies of Internal Bleeding on Wedding Night: Activist.” Reuters. Thomson Reuters, 2013. Web.

“11-year-old Bride Sets Herself on Fire to Avoid Marriage – Articles – Easy Weddings.” Articles. N.p., 2014. Web.

 

 

Wk 12 – Assessment workbook processes

Wk 12 – Assessment workbook processes

ADDITIONS

-Added iconography (hanging noose over sad girl and happy smiley face above happy child

-Also added dandelion on both children. Happy child is holding one in her hands and is happily blowing them into the air while sad child’s dandelion has fallen apart on the ground with the seedlings scattered underneath her.

FINAL CREATIVE WORK

My final piece
Kim, Janetta
“Your childhood vs mine”
15/06/2016
Collage paper craft

My final work showcases the idea of how child marriages ruin the future of the young bride. The child on the left is happy, carefree and stands upright because she is not pressed. The warm colours she is made out of shows she is cheerful, happy, content, optimistic, full of vitality and energetic. Her larger share of the background in white shows her larger expected life as she is not a victim of child marriages. She will enjoy her childhood, live a normal life and grow up.

The child on the right is crouched in a defensive position with a smaller background for short life. She is made out of the colours of blue, green and grey – colours that encourage and represent feelings of sadness, depression and hopelessness. She is a victim of child marriages and has missed out on her childhood.

This piece is to highlight the difference between “normal” children and young girls who face child marriage.

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